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hillary clinton involved in a major deal with israel and hamas. a cease-fire that's to end bloodshed on both sides of the border. but there's violence including a bus bombing injuring nearly two dozen people in the heart of tel aviv. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer reporting from jerusalem. you're in "the situation room." >>> we're now two hours into a cease-fire between israel and hamas and so far things have been relatively quiet. the israeli military reports at least two rockets being fired into israel after the cease-fire deadline. this is the scene right now in gaza city. it's remarkable. for the first time in days people are out in the streets. they are celebrating. traffic is bumper-to-bumper. everyone, everyone appears to be in celebration. people waving flags and firing guns in the air. while our crews saw outgoing rockets and heard explosions in the hours leading up to the cease-fire deadline, they've seen little or no military activity since then only the celebrating. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillar
in israel including an israeli soldier who died in a rocket strike today. we want to get more from nbc correspondent, ayman mohyeldin, who joins me from gaza. you reached out to the egyptian authorities about what's taking place, when this deal will be announced. what are you hearing about the possibility of that happening this hour? >> well, right now what we're hearing from egyptian officials is that they're still working to finalize that agreement. there are some areas where the gap between the two sides has been narrowed, but there are still some very important issues that have not been addressed. you know, we are talking about trying to solve one of the most complex issues here in gaza. that has to be do with the blockade. there's no indication that israel will try to do that any time soon. they want to try to divide or break up the truce into different stages. first, an immediate cessation of violence on both sides. that could pave the way for talking about some of the more complex issues that both sides want to address. right now, it doesn't seem they're going to go for all of t
. happening now, no cease fire, no peace. just another day of deadly attacks in gaza and israel. the secretary of state, hillary clinton, she's here in israel right now. she's trying to find some way to broker a deal to stop the fighting. all the while civilians on both sides of the israeli/gaza border live in terror. the next explosion could claim their homes, relatives or their own lives. we'd like to welcome our viewers from the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer reporting from jerusalem. you're in "the situation room." >>> we're coming to you from jerusalem the end of the seventh day of this deadly crisis. it's been two hours since we expected an official of hamas, the militant organization that controls gaza, to come before cameras in egypt and announce a period of calm. but that announcement has not happened. instead, the office of the e jimgs president, mohamed morsi, told cnn the egyptian government has no plans to make an announcement tonight. since wednesday of last week militants have fired hundreds of rockets into israel. we're about to bring you one family's harr
the seventh day of deadly violence between israel and gaza. no cease-fire tonight. blasts continuing overnight. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton in jerusalem to meet with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. that meeting moments ago. >>> and four men from southern california arrested by the fbi. accused of trying to join al qaeda and wage violent jihad against america. >>> let's go "outfront." ♪ >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, no cease-fire. the killing continues in israel and gaza. the conflict in its seventh day. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton in jerusalem tonight. she arrived late and went straight to a meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock-solid, and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> deescalate the situation in gaza. what does deescalate mean? there was a spade of rockets just a moment ago, but yet that's the key word being used by the administration. during a brief press conference with prime minister
>>> tonight, cease-fire, israel and hamas lay down their arms, for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. the right thing for the state of israel is to exhaust this opportunity to obtain a long-term cease-fire. >> our brothers will guarantee the implementation of all of these understandings in this agreement. >> will the fragile peace hold? also, rudy giuliani on what it means. >> plus, we'll be talking about hillary clinton, the stars battle it out. this is "piers morgan tonight." good evening, big story tonight, celebrations in the middle east over the fragile peace, a cease-fire, the israeli president, netanyahu. >> we want the entire world to understand our people. and we can explain the faces, the pale faces of the leaders of the enemy, because they have failed in their attempt. >> i have toay that all of this was done with the firm support on the part of the leaders of the international community, and i would like especially to thank president barack obama for his unreserved support. >> questions on both sides and around the world. how long can peace last? i w
we'll have live reports from gaza and ashkelon, israel, in moments. yesterday, around this time, we reported on hopes for a break in cross border rocket attacks, but a senior hamas official described to cnn as a calming down period. even as diplomats including secretary of state hillary clinton searched for a truce, the fighting last night intensified. israel trained rockets and artillery fire on gaza overnight. 100 confirmed strikes destroyed bridges, tunnels and buildings. hamas returned fire with dozens of rockets, 62. about a third were intercepted by the iron dome defense system. this attack, a bomb, a public bus around lunch time, not far from israel's military headquarters. the blast wounded 24 people, added a new urgency to efforts to reach a cease-fire. the military wing of hamas tweeted to israelis, you opened the gates of hell on yourselves. 40 minutes after the bus bombing, our cameras captured this explosion in gaza city. all the while there was a flurry of diplomating activity. secretary clinton met with palestinian authority mahmoud abbas in the west bank and benjamin
for unprecedented power. so far, so good, that cease fire between israel and hamas is holding for now. but there are real fears even the slightest flare-up could kick off chaos. >>> how was i to know he would do a dumb thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy. hollywood reacting this morning to the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 a.m. on the west, and here's where we start this morning. larry hagman's family says he was surrounded by family at the end. the 81-year-old actor died of complications from cancer. he's best known for his iconic portrayal of j.r. ewing in the show "dallas." it's a role that he always called his favorite. peter fonda said goodbye to his friend on twitter, saying hagman brought so much fun to everyone's life. cnn entertainment corresponde m correspondent careen winter joins us. i understand that you are at larry hagman's star on the hollywood walk of fame. are people showing up to pay their respects? >> not yet, but you can bet that will change as the morning continues. w
, but the cease-fire between israel and hamas was only a first step toward seeking a broader piece in a very volatile region. and now one of the crucial players in securing the truce is under fire in his own country. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formatio
.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hillary clinton's arriving soon in jerusalem about three hours or so from now. she'll go to ramallah, then on to cairo. why would she be meeting with the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas? he has nothing to do with what is taking place in hamas and is this really something that is more symbolic here? >> there's a lot of symbol itch because the u.s. has a lot at stake in the palestinian authority leadership of abbas and the prime minister. the u.s. has had very good relations with the palestinian leader whose believe in a two-state solution. israel and palestine. there's a very good relationship there and the u.s. provides extensive economic assistance to the palestinian authority on the west bank. but you know what? the problem for the palestinian authority is, in recent days, as hamas has engaged in this continuing struggle with israel, its reputation, at least in the palestinian community and i
clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both. stephanie, i want to start with you, is the attack we were just discussing in tel aviv an indication that cease-fire talks are not actually on track? >> no, that's not the case, ari. they aren't necessarily connected. at the very least they're are probably -- it's probably complicating the conversations, but right now, the talks keep going on, the negotiations keep going on. israeli officials saying they still are looking for that guarantee that rockets aren't going to come out of gaza towards israel. that is their stipulation. we heard the defense minister ehud barak say today that right out of the gate, what they w
. this morning israel is agreeing to hold off on a ground offensive in to gaza. secretary of state hillary clinton heading into the region at this hour. she's going to be meting with leaders in israel, in egypt, in ramallah, that's going to start tomorrow. the israelis carrying out more than 80 air strikes overnight. 95 rockets back across the border. 38 palestinians killed in the last 24 hours. cnn has the conflict covered from all sides. christiane amanpour is live in jerusalem, arwa damon is on the ground in gaza city, richard plight again is in ashkelon in israel, jessica yellin is live in cambodia where secretary clinton has departed heading for the middle east. we begin with christiane. welcome. give us a sense of this new announcement from israel. how long do you think israel is waiting to silt on this halt before it would move forward with sending ground troops in? >> well, what was reported was that a senior government official in the loop close to the talks has confirmed to me this morning that after the latest intense round of conversations and meetings between prime minister ne
-fire in the conflict between israel and hamas and we talk to huff benn from "ha'aretz." >> i think a cease-fire will be put in place. i hope it will happen wiin the next 24ours to preven and avd and do without the ground invasion with its deadly cost and then when it takes the place with the new leader of hamas who has to impose the cease-fire on all the other groups in gaza who are aiming at launching rockets or firing into israeli territory. but at the same time, clearly israel will have to let go some of its black cade of gaza. >> rose: also, david ignatius of the "washington post" from washington. >> on the larger question here of whether the obama administration before the election had an interest in minimizing the public's understanding that al qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on t
so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. new flashpoint in the isra israel/gaza conflict threatens to implode today's peace talks. a bomb rips apart a bus in tel aviv, israel's second largest city. 22 people injured and tensions rise again across the region. hamas praises the attack. it's not claiming responsibility. in gaza, streets are empty as civilians brace for the israeli response. so far, secretary of state hillary clinton, the challenge of brokering a cease fire, it grows even more daunting this morning. more on those diplomatic efforts in a minute. first the latest details on that bus attack. sara sidner is on the phone from tel aviv. what's the latest, sara? >> reporter: where the victims of this bus attack are. we know that now 22 people have been injured. some of those were inside the bus, some of the people were outside of the bus. there are two very serious injuries, both of them teenagers according to hospital officials here and they are doing surgery as we speak. what we dough do know is that so far doctors are saying that all the victims are expected to s
're also following breaking news just awhile ago, more carnage in the battle between israel and gaza. a bomb exploded on a bus in tel aviv. injured at least ten people. happened right in front of israel's national defense headquarters. a spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says this is a terrorist act. this as 100 israeli air strikes have killed more than 27 palestinians. the death toll in eight days there up to 137. the secretary of state hillary clinton is finishing up those direct talks this morning with the palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas. that's happening in ramallah on the west bank. and netanyahu, the prime minister, in jerusalem, another conversation she's having. now she goes to cairo where she's meeting with the egyptian president mursi. mrs. clinton making it clear that she is not interested in a quick fix in gaza. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability, and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> cnn reporters flanking the middle east today to bring you th
, clearly israel will have to let go some of its black cade of gaza. >> rose: also, david ignatius of the "washington post" from washington. >> on the larger question here of whether the obama administration before the election had an interest in minimizing the public's understanding that al qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, david ignatius and julian sands when we continue
's friday, november 23. welcome to msnbc live. developing now the ceasefire between israel and hamas may have been broken. palestinian medical services say a man was killed by israeli forces on the gaza side of the border. israeli government spokesman mark regev told me an hour ago they are still looking into the incident. they have not confirmed that it happened, but this all comes after a day and a half of calm in the region following those eight days of rocket and missile attacks which left nearly 170 dead. >>> we have reporters on both sides of the conflict and we begin with nbc news' ayman my yell d mohyeldin. >> reporter: palestinian factions and medical sources are not making any doubt as to who is responsible for this violation of the ceasefire. the israeli military says it may not have confirmed it killed anyone but no doubt after speaking to the family of the victim as well as the sources here on the ground there has been one person killed as a result of that attack. now according to palestinians, this was in their eyes their right to go to the territory which is a no go zone b
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo to meet with egyptian president mohamed morsi who is key to brokering any deal. it's her final stop on an emergency round of shuttle diplomacy that also include meetings in israel and the west bank. for the latest nbc's stephanie gosk joins us and ayman mohyeldin. a report of a tel aviv bus explosion. is there any indication that the israelis now are looking at possibly having a short-term truce or want to hold out long er for a longer deal? >> reporter: well, we don't have a truce. there's a lot of talk yesterday that there would be one, and then this morning, today around lunch time this bus attack. and what we know about it so far is that they're saying it's a terrorist attack, it's not a suicide attack. we were down there ea
and israel. >> reporter: good morning. that vote will take place in the general assembly where there will be only observer status. to become a member you need u.n. security council and that won't happen because the u.s. will veto it. the u.s. and israel tried hard to get palestine not to go along with today's vote. but they are now down playing it it doesn't give palestine what it wants. it's quiet this morning outside the u.n. but demonstrators are expected to protest the vote on palestinian recognition. palestinians are seeking status as a nonmember observer. palestinians say they need u.n. recognition of a palestinian state in the west bank in order to get israel back to the negotiating table. the u.s. insists on direct negotiations with israel. >> the path to a two state solution is through jerusalem and ramallah, not new york. >> reporter: they recognized the palestine 1977 borders before israel fought and won part of palestinian land. >> we know the occupation will not disappear, we know that there might be certain consequences because israel wants to punish us. >> report
pretty well in terms of -- from the western perspective in working with israel. he has a lot to prove to the outside world and his own people. >> reporter: now, the obama administration is calling for calm in egypt pushing the leadership there to work together to resolve their differences peacefully and through "democratic dialogue." joe. >> everybody i think is a little stunned about the timing of all of this, dan. is the white house saying anything about whether there's some type of linkage between the timing of the gaza agreement and this move by mohamed morsi? >> reporter: they're not at all. in fact, the white house has been really pushing a lot of the comment on this through the state department which of course as i mentioned a short time ago did release that statement. i think it's really too early to tell. they are watching carefully what the developments are there and will have more comment i suspect as they get more information. >> thanks so much for that, dan lothian at the white house. we're just over two days into the israeli/hamas cease-fire along the gaza border and alr
. happy thanksgiving. i'm alex witt. with latest from israel to the big parade in manhattan a packed morning for you. the balloons are filled, ready to go, talking about the 86th annual macy's thanksgiving day parade. live for you along the parade route. >>> the president is behind her, now u.n. ambassador susan rice defendinging her record to critics taking her to task on benghazi. will it be enough? >>> celebrations in gaza. so far, the day-old cease-fire is holding but the real work begins. and that fragile cease-fire between israel and hamas militants brokered by the u.s. government and egyptian president morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last
. >> a big day in the middle east. today both israel and gaza meet to further the cease-fire between the two embattled nations. we're going to have a live report coming up for you. >> gray thursday, black friday, and now cyber monday. but just how good are the deals today, compared to what was put out this past holiday weekend? we're going to break it all down for you. >> did you do any shopping? >> absolutely not. there's too much football. >> don't you love it? >> good morning. welcome to "early start," i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. 5:00 a.m. in the east. so let's get started. they are back. our lame duck congress returning to capitol hill today. the senate in session this afternoon. the house back tomorrow. and with 35 days left, as john just reminded us, before we plunge down the fiscal cliff, two prominent republican senators, lindsey graham and saxby chambliss are signaling they are willing to give a break the no tax pledge. that is a hopeful sign, folks, because a new cnn/orc poll shows more than two thirds of americans believe a trip over that cliff would create major
it is absolutely convinced that israel is behind the death of yasser arafat. israel denies this, and in most cases says it won't even comment on these allegations. however, if if does come to light that yasser arafat was indeed poisoned, that will lead to a gigantic investigation to then found out who did it. fred pleitken, cnn, ramallah. >> much more ahead this hour. >> here's a look at what's coming up. >>> so far so good. that cease-fire between israel and hamas is holding for now, but there are real fears even the slightest flare-up could kick off chaos. plus, there was black friday, gray thursday. up next cyber monday. the holidays are here, and the retailers are ready. >> and you drove cliff to attempt suicide? >> how was i to know he was going to do a dumb thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy. hollywood reacting this morning to the the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. what is that? it's you! it's me? alright emma, i know it's not your favorite but it's time for your medicine, okay? you ready? one, two, three. [ both ] ♪ emma, emma bo-bemma ♪ banana-fana-fo-femma ♪ fee-fi-
in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. reza, is morsi's government strong enough, so early in this administration, to withstand this level of protests? >> reporter: well, we're going to find out in the coming weeks, but the political landscape is certainly in his favor. he's got the backing of police and security forces, but make no mistake, these are demonstrators, protesters that are determined and energized. many say one of the outcomes of the 2011 revolution was that many egyptians lost their fear and inhibition to protests and speak up. in other words, from now on, if they don't like something, they're not going to be afraid to speak up and say it and that's what we're seeing today, thousands of angry demonstrators filing into tahrir square and other egy
'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator for the time being or might have unprecedented power throughout this period of two months, but after that, these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament. >> brown: but tens of thousands of anti-morsi protesters rallied in tahrir square, the heart of last year's popular revolution that led to end of the regime of hosni mubarak. they threw rocks at riot police, who retaliate
, and to the middle east now, that truce between israel and hamas holding. but now, a brewing crisis in egypt. giant protests because of their new leader and what he's done. president mohamed morsi, seen here with secretary of state hillary clinton, helping to broker that truce, but right after, a push from morsi for more power. many of the people of egypt said not so fast, and the protests are growing now. abc's matt gutman in the region again tonight for us. >> reporter: with massive protests, a cloud of tier gas, egypt is again in turmoil tonight. the violence, a reaction to egypt's first democratically elected leader, mohamed morsi, declaring all his presidential decisions are exempt from appeal or review by law makers or the courts. protesters torching a muslim brother office in alexandria and mohamed elle bar are detweeting, he appointed himself egypt's new f farrow. >> just months ago, morsi was obscure before being elected in may, shooting to international prominence this week by brokers the hamas/israel cease-fire. solidifying himself as a key u.s. al li. >> i want to thank president morsi
ago mohamed morsi won widespread praise for brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today thousands of egyptians protested at morsi granted himself broad new powers, putting his decisions above any court. morsi called the move temporary but at least 100 people were injured as protesters clashed with police in cities across egypt, including alexandria and the capital. holly williams begins our coverage tonight in cairo. >> reporter: thousands of egyptians poured on to the streets, furious with the country's first democratically elected president. they accused mohamed morsi of behaving like a pharaoh, making a power grab by presidential decree. during the arab spring, egyptians came together on tahrir square to top it will country's long-time dictator hosni mubarak. today mr. morsi's critics clashed with his supporters while police fired tear gas canisters into the crowd. "he's saying that he's our god" said this protester. "he's made a mistake." and this woman said that after marching for freedom the country's ended up with a new dictator. in alexandria, an angry crowd stor
the cease-fire because israel's response was quick. they fired warning shots at the palestinians, in the end they ended up killing one of the forces. palestinians are going to be protesting that to the united nations. but at the same time hamas also responded quickly. today they're keeping protesters away from the fence. they don't want any more of these kinds of clashes with israelis see as provocations. so i think it's clear both sides do want the cease-fire to continue. they both have a very strong vested interest in doing so. and that kind of incident yesterday, which led to the unfortunate death of one palestinian, i doubt that will be repeated in the days to come. the emphasis on both sides is going to be on the next stage, which as you mentioned, which is outlining the details, dealing with the details of what the cease-fire is, what it leads to. what they've got so far is what they've called quiet for quiet. both sides not shooting. what's next is the beginning of the negotiations. it's quite clear what the two sides want although it's going to appear complicated. it's simple and it'
between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of key republicans are now suggesting that they're willing to forego their no tax pledge to try to get a budget deal done and avoid massive tax hikes, and spending cuts that will come in the new year. brand-new
, egypt, this morning. as you know egypt has been a key player in brokering the cease-fire between israel and hamas. today in cairo, mediators continue talks with israel. topics will include opening border crossing and easing israel's economic blockade in gaza. the ongoing talks come as the palestinian authority leaders go before the united nations this week to renew their bid for statehood. >>> also new this morning, israel's defense minister says he will leave his post in january. ehud barak says he wants to spend more time with his family. but there's been a lot of buzz he's forming a new party. he's led israel's military for the last five years and served as the nation's prime minister for a couple of years before that. >>> is it over, grover? republicans back away from grover norquist's anti-tax pledge. what do republicans want in return? that's our talk back question today. ♪ [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans
, on the constitution and the attack on the judges right after he brokered the deal between israel and hamas. so he was already rending services in the international community and then asking for a license at home. it's really basically a page from the book of hosni mubarak. i think in washington, there is great uncertainty, what to do with the islamists in power. this is not just from this crisis of november 2b 22nd, this crisis of the last week behind us. this has been the case since the fall of the dictatorship of hosni mubarak, what to do with the islamists in egypt, what to do with the islamists in tunisia and what to do with the rise of the islamists in the region as a whole. >> over the weekend, senator john mccain said, our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy. if you add up all the economic and military assistance the u.s. gives egypt every year, it's about $1.5 billion. should that be used as leverage to try to get egypt back on this democracy road? >> well, i usually have great deference to the opinions of senator mccain. i see things on national security th
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
that arafat was poisoned by israel. israel denies those allegations. >>> back this country, the white house says treasury secretary timothy geithner will leave the negotiations with republicans on the so called fiscal cliff, those tax increases and spending cuts that would kick in next year. lawmakers returned to washington yesterday amid some talk of compromise, but the issue of how to raise revenue remains a critical and hard to overcome sticking point. susan mcginnis is live in washington with more. >> reporter: those changes kick in if no alternative deal is made. as of now, both sides are still talking about their willingness to compromise, but when it comes to that main issue, raising tax rates, both sides are digging in. democratic senator dick durbin will give what's being called a major speech laying out a case for a bipartisan fiscal deal. he's a member of the senate's gang of eight, four democrats and four republicans who have collaborated on ways to reduce the nation's debt for two and a half years. democratic senator mark warner is part of the gang and says democrats are willin
interest of israel or perhaps the middle east overall. david lee miller joins us live in jerusalem. david, what is the reaction from israel to this planned vote today at the u.n.? >> the israeli reaction to the vote which is scheduled for thursday, martha is essentially one of resignation. there is not a lot of drum ma or uncertainty about the out cox the vote. israel and much of the world fully expects that the palestinian bid for a known observer status to pass overwhelmingly at the united nation. israel says it rejects the notion that the pal steup palestinians are acting eu unilaterally. israel has to be tkaeufl tha to to be careful that it doesn't impose sanctions or things that are damaging to mahmoud abbas. it could lead to a strengthening of hamas. as to the palestinian authority this is largely a symbolic effort. 132 nations currently recognize palestine. they are hoping for a vote that could produce 170 positive votes. we'll find out very soon. martha: we sure will. david lee thank you. bill: republicans have their own version of the d.r.e.a.m. act. how do you solve illegal immi
between israel and hamas is facing a test this morning. amid reports of a deadly shoot i ing. it happened in the border town of khan younis. sara sidner is in jerusalem. what can you tell us about this, sara? >> reporter: carol, we're hearing from the health ministry in gaza, saying the 25 people were injured, one person killed in the past 24 hours. they're saying that it was farmers who were in the area of east of khan younis in gaza, border area. we also heard from the israeli military who has a very different story, saying several groups of men had come up to the border, the fence, tried to go over on to the israeli side, protesting israel, that the soldiers fired in the air as a warning shot and then fired at their legs. the israeli military not commenting and not confirming yet because they're investigating whether or not someone was killed or whether there are any injuries. but at this point the health department is saying that, indeed, there were several injuries. this is coming at a very intense time. as you know, it's not even been 48 hours since the cease fire was put in place a
as egypt's president expands his power on the heels of helping to broker a ceasefire between israel and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxe
abruptly quit this morning. he's known as a leading strategist as israel confronts iran's nuclear program. he's looking forward to spending more time with his family. he will spend his current post until the new government is formed as the new elections are on january 23rd. >>> and on to egypt, things are calm right now after four straight nights of violent protests. tahrir square, a large crowd still camped out there. and just in the past hour mohamed morsi met with top judges. morsi issued a decree seizing new powers. it sparked massive riots that killed one protesters. nbc's jim maceda joins us live. we were advised to be careful when saying morsi tried to seize power. specifically run down the decree or what he's seeking here. >> reporter: well, the whole issue of power is what's at stake, and you mentioned that meeting in your lead. that meeting with -- between morsi and top egyptian judges is absolutely critical to this whole playing out of what's going to happen to egyptians in this country. that face-to-face meeting has been going on now for almost four hours. there were indicatio
with recognition. it is a setback for israel and the united states. margaret brennan joins us to tell us why the u.s. voted no. >> reporter: good morning to you, charlie, and to norah. israeli government says it gives palestinians a state without ending the conflict. u.n. recognition makes the west bank and gaza strip part of the palestinian state not defeated territory. without negotiating the borders of one with israel. here is the problem. negotiation negotiations are in a standstill. as we saw last week violent extremists like hamas are gaining influence. palestinian authority, which rejects violence, recognizes israel, is losing influence and patience. last week secretary clinton c s successfully negotiated the cease fire but wasn't able to persuade palestinian president mahmoud abbas to drop this bid. >> margaret, are there consequences for the united states and iz role for this vote? >> reporter: potentially. the concern is that congress could cut off funds to the palestinian authority. the u.s. gave about $495 million in aid last year, which helped keep that peaceful government in power.
will be immediately reburied with full military honors. palestinians are convinced israel supplied the poison. bedali is more interested in finding out if they had help from palestinian collaborators. >> a body has to be respected. we should know who did it and i don't think that by taking of his body they will know it. >> reporter: in the meantime, his image remains useful. it held pride of place at a demonstration to support a bid to gain observer status at the united nations for the palestinian state arafat spent his life trying to create two days after he was to be dug up and reburied. allen pizzey, cbs news, ramallah. >>> in massachusetts, officials are blaming a utility worker for a massive natural gas explosion. the blast friday night injured 18 people and damaged 42 buildings in springfield. the state fire marshal says the worker was responding to a gas leak when he accidentally punctured an underground pipe. and immediately called the fire department. >>> coming up mention, your weather forecast. and in sports a show of solid darety in indianapolis. two colts cheerleaders get buzzed for a go
. there was the agreement with israel, mubarak was an ally of the united states, a cut off aid not good to his own people but cooperated with us with the war on terror. all of the ingredients were there 18 months ago they are still there but 75% of the population is under the age of 30. they don't have jobs and the prospects. they toppled their dictator but things have not got better so they are back on the streets. >> did we misinterpret what the appraise saying was about? arab sprained, fighting for there rights when it was about religion? >> more about economic prospects. revolutions happen with a large baby-boom population. american revolution. chinese revolution, french revolution. even eastern europe and the soviet union. with a population bubble when you add economic disaster with good prospects down the road people take to the streets the economy in egypt has not gotten better. >> then to have the right course of the track them to replace with another dictator. >> that has not because of political stability. they are getting their money out with business opportunities and prospects so people are
responsibility. >> the truce is holding between hamas and israel after eight days of fighting. palestinian students were now feeling free enough to walk back to school. and with israeli troops retreated from the border, hamas officials have announced the restriction on palestinian fishermen has been loosened as part of the cease-fire deal. fishermen are now permitted to head out six miles offshore rather than just three. >>> in syria, rebels claim they have overrun a key base west of aleppo and purged the assad regime from a whole swath of land near the iraqi border, but the killing continues. according to a major opposition group, 32 fepeople have been killed across syria today. >>> here in the states, the focus is retail shopping. black friday may be history, but the hunt for bargains is far from over. that's because we've still got cyber monday ahead of us. it looks like it could be the busiest ever. trish is the host of "street smart" on bloomberg tv. good to see you. >> good to see you, fredricka. >> i know we don't know exactly how well the retailers did on black friday, especially s
's yours? >> mine is something my friend drew hammer gave me. we went to israel this april. when i looked down, there was a stone there exactly like a real heart, and she had just come through a 27-year marriage ending and she felt like she had a heart of stone. that was a reminder to let her heart again become soft and tender towards the world. so she set it up, it's called hammeredheart.org. a charitable foundation, all proceeds go to churches around america where ministries help single women in need who have gone through the devastation of divorce. prices start at -- oh, they are expensive. $295, and it is gold and goes to a good cause. >> sara, what do you got? >> decorating my apartment and recently found this amazing blanket. i've been covering up in it all weekend. no, thiis actually my favorite thing. it's the gel nail kit, about $79, a gel manicure lasts longer. this you can do it yourself. i had it on last week, it's amazing. it will save you money in the long run. >> i have a concern about damaging nail beds, i do it on my toes. >>> we have a contest winner to announce. >> if y
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